Mystery in a school: nearly 100 students and teachers have had rare brain tumors

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Mystery in a school: nearly 100 students and teachers have had rare brain tumors

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The facade of Colonia High School in Woodbridge, New Jersey, where the mystery of cancer cases continues.

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Mystery continues to wrap around the story of a New Jersey high school, where nearly 100 people who passed through its classrooms were associated with a common diagnosis: develop “extremely” rare malignant brain tumors.

The majority of those who had brain tumors “graduated between 1975 and 2000, although outliers occurred more recently than those who graduated in 2014,” according to Star-Ledger.

The school was built in 1967 and now has about 1,300 students, many of whom are said to be concerned and eager for research.

One of those affected 94 former staff and students at Colonia High School in the Woodbridge Township School District was kay lupianwhich drives the claim to investigate the reasons for the destructive evaluations in recent years of nearly 100 people.

Al Lupiano and his wife Michelle.  Last year her husband, who also studied in Cologne, was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor.

Al Lupiano and his wife Michelle. Last year her husband, who also studied in Cologne, was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor.

“I’m not going to rest until I have the answers,” Lupiano, 50, said in an interview with NJ.com and Star-Ledger. “I will discover the truth,” said post in a report.

Lupiano has a family history that reinforces his struggle to find the truth: Among others diagnosed with brain cancer is his younger sister, who died of the disease in February at the age of 44.

Lupiano promised his dying sister that he would find out the cause of the seemingly cancer cluster at Colonia High. And he got local officials to approve an emergency school investigation.

Last year her husband, who also studied in Cologne, was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor. On the exact same day, Lupiano’s younger sister Angela DeCillis, another Cologne alumna, found out that she also had brain cancer, she told the Post.

a big question mark

“There could be a real problem here, and our residents should know if there is any risk,” Woodbridge Mayor John McCormac said in a statement. “We are all worried and we all want to get under it. It’s really not normal. “

Starting this weekend, various radiological evaluations will be conducted on the school campus, including testing indoor air samples for radon.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless radioactive gas. It is produced by the natural radioactive decay of uranium present in soils and rocks. And it can also be present in water.

Expert personnel conduct radiological studies on the school baseball field.

Expert personnel conduct radiological studies on the school baseball field.

Radon easily comes from the ground and enters the air, where it decomposes and releases other radioactive particles. Respiration inhales these particles, which live in cells lined the airways, where they can damage DNA and lead to lung cancer.

Lupiano was diagnosed with a brain tumor in the late 1990s, at the age of 27. He then recovered from the disease.

Last year her husband, who also studied in Cologne, was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor. That same day, Lupiano’s younger sister Angela DeCillis, another former student from Cologne, learned that she too had brain cancer.

After the death of his sister in February, Lupiano became convinced of a link between the Cologne campus and the brain cancers he, his wife, and his sister had and put together a Facebook group asking locals if they knew anyone else associated with the school who had been affected by similar diagnoses.

In less than six weeks, Lupiano said, he collected the names of 94 school -associated people who had brain tumors, the Post reports.

The news hit the front page this week afterwards CBSNews it will be taken to the national level. A subsequent TikTok video discussing the medical mystery also garnered more than 2.2 million viral views in just 24 hours.

“Finding something like this … is an important discovery,” Drs. Sumul Raval, one of New Jersey’s leading neuro-oncologists, at the exit. “Normally speaking, you don’t get radiation in high school … unless something is going on in that area that we don’t know about”, Added Raval, who called for an immediate investigation.

The viral TikTok video discussing the alleged cancer cluster was posted on Wednesday by popular personality Dr. Joe Whittington.

Whittington, a board-certified physician in California, said some of the brain tumors developed by former Colonia High staff and students were glioblastoma multiformean aggressive cancer that spreads to brain tissue, the Post reports.

Meanwhile, TikTok’s video has caused panic and various conspiracy theory -style comments, with people saying the cluster could be caused by mold, toxic waste, asbestos, and nearby cell phone towers. .

Lupiano also spoke to CBS News on Thursday and said he now believes Ionizing radiation should be responsible for health problems.

“What I find alarming is that there’s only really one link in the environment to major brain tumors, and that’s ionizing radiation,” he said. “It is not contaminated water. It’s not wind. It is not an earthly thing. It is not something that is done to us because of bad habits. ”

The school was built in 1967 on acres of vacant land, and McCormac told the news outlet he didn’t know what could cause cancers.

The school is located less than 12 miles from the Middlesex Sampling Plant, a site used, under the direction of the Manhattan Project, to grind, dry, store, package and ship uranium ore for atomic bomb formation.

Lupiano said some of the contaminated soil was removed from the site when it closed in 1967, the same year Colonia High School was built. astonishment of lupian if any of that land went into the school yard.

Source: Clarin

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