In a painting from 1860, a woman appears with an “iPhone” in her hand.

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Social networks are the perfect tool to open theories and interpretations on any topic. This is what happened to the painting The expected created in 1860 by the Austrian painter Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller.

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In the work we see a woman walking along a path, while a young man is waiting for her a little further on to surprise her with flowers. The fact is that young people he holds in his hands a small black object which he grasps with both hands, thumbs up and seems to be watching intently. Many Internet users have wanted to associate it with an iPhone.

As a man crouches waiting to throw her a flower, she doesn’t even look up.

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The work has been realized in 1860 by an Austrian artist.

The work has been realized in 1860 by an Austrian artist.

This first one went viral in 2017 after being seen at the Neue Pinakothek in Munich, where the painting, The Expected One, by Ferdinand George Waldmüller is housed.

But it turns out she’s no boring Instagram-watching time traveler. In reality, she is concentrating on reading a prayer book. In fact, it is enough to look to see that a rosary hangs from her hands.

The official clarification says that the woman is holding a prayer book.

The official clarification says that the woman is holding a prayer book.

“The girl in this painting by Waldmüller is not playing with her new iPhone X, but she is walking to church with a small prayer book in her hand,” Gerald Weinpolter, the news agency’s executive director, told the New York Post Motherboard. . paintings.a.

“The great social change is that in the 1850s or 1860s all spectators would have identified the object in which the girl is engrossed as a hymnal or a prayer book.. Today, no one could fail to see the resemblance to the scene of a teenage girl engrossed in social networking on her smartphone,” explained Peter Russell, a retired local government official from Glasgow and one of the forerunners of the debate over this painting.

Source: Clarin

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