Do Collagen Supplements Work? The strong opinion of Harvard scientists

Share This Post

- Advertisement -

Collagen supplements capture the attention of people who are most attentive to the beauty and appearance of their skin.

- Advertisement -

Although, along with its popularity, opinions about its null effect are emerging.

WhatWhich position to choose? Do these new youth potions really work?

- Advertisement -

According to a note from the health disclosure site by harvardmany people who have consumed these products have reported an improvement in skin firmness, elasticity and hydration.

Additionally, they noticed a reduction in wrinkles.

Harvard scientists indicate that there is currently no scientific evidence on the benefits of collagen supplements. Foto Shutterstock.

Harvard scientists indicate that there is currently no scientific evidence on the benefits of collagen supplements. Foto Shutterstock.

At first glance, the results are more than auspicious.

But Harvard scientists did not stop at these statements and went a little further.

The note from the Harvard medical site clarifies that the the people who were surveyed chose supplements that contained more than just collagen. The selected presentations had among their ingredients vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, coenzyme Q10, hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate. With which it is not possible to determine which was the compound that really generated the change.

Are there studies on collagen?

On the other hand, the same note indicates that a small study conducted in 2017 with 25 people showed that taking 2.5 grams of collagen per day for 24 weeks improved nail brittleness and growth.

However, the same source clarifies that this small survey didn’t have a control group taking a placebo to compare the differences.

Collagen supplements have other compounds to benefit the skin Photo Shutterstock.

Collagen supplements have other compounds to benefit the skin Photo Shutterstock.

The truth about collagen

With this information, the note concludes that today there is no medical evidence to support marketing claims that collagen supplements or drinks are for skin or hair beauty.

The text also indicates that our bodies cannot fully absorb collagen. On the other hand, it is not clearly demonstrated how collagen taken orally reaches the skin, hair or nails.

With which, everything would indicate that the powder or drinkable supplements are not effective in improving the appearance of the skin.

Furthermore, it recommends consulting a doctor in case of doubt and, even more so, in case of particular medical situations.

Source: Clarin

- Advertisement -

Related Posts