What was the last thing Stephen Hawking said before he died?

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In the vast universe of human knowledge, few names resonate as deeply as that of Stephen Hawking.

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An intellectual titan, an icon of modern science, and a visionary whose ideas transcended the limits of space and time, Hawking left a indelible mark in the history of humanity.

His mind illuminated the dark corners of the cosmos, challenging the boundaries of understanding and opening new doors to understanding the universe. Also he overcame the limitations imposed by his body weakened by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)an illness that left him confined to a wheelchair when he was 21.

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However, his indomitable spirit and passion for unlocking the mysteries of the universe led him to reach intellectual heights that few can match. An example of this is the popular best-seller, Brief history of timepublished in 1988.

On March 14, 2018, Hawking he died at 76 years old. But even in his last breath, this tireless science communicator, well known for having popularized the Big Bang theory, left an indelible mark.

What was the last thing Stephen Hawking said before he died?

Hawking, one of the biggest scientific celebrities since Einstein.  They died at the same age: 76 years old.  Photo: Clarin.Hawking, one of the biggest scientific celebrities since Einstein. They died at the same age: 76 years old. Photo: Clarin.

The circumstances surrounding the last words of Hawking have been the subject of speculation and curiosity since his death. While the exact truth behind his words may be shrouded in mystery, a book he wrote, Short answers to big questionsAND the best source for the question.

According to the book published posthumously by his daughter Lucy Hawking, who works as a journalist, one of his last sentences was “There is no God, no one governs the universe”.

Before dying, in the TV show Genius of Great BritainHawking he had assured “The question is: Was the way the universe began chosen by God for reasons we cannot understand, or was it determined by a scientific law?” I believe in the second. If you want, you can call the laws of science God, but he wouldn’t be a personal God that you could meet and ask questions about.”

It’s also in the book another sentence which, over the years, has become one of Hawking’s best known. In the last chapter the author tries to answer the question: how do we shape the future? and he says: “Remember to look at the stars and not at your feet.”.

For Hawking, stars were much more than just bright points in the night sky; they were beacons of knowledge, guides in your eternal quest for understanding. Throughout her life, she explored the furthest reaches of space-time, unlocking the secrets of black holes, the nature of time, and the very origin of the universe.

Lucy Hawking published a posthumous book about her father in which the scientist asked a question sentence.  Photo: Clarin.Lucy Hawking published a posthumous book about her father in which the scientist asked a question sentence. Photo: Clarin.

Ultimately, Stephen Hawking’s last words encourage people to find meaning and purpose in their lives. They are a reminder that while the body may be fragile and life itself ephemeral, the mind has the power to reach for the stars and embrace the immensity of the universe.

Beyond the meaning of his last sentences, contained in his latest book, Hawking’s contribution to the knowledge of the cosmos is inevitable.

Source: Clarin

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